Course Content

First year Clinical Skills ~ Family Practice
September – December (MEDD 411)

  • For this segment of the FPC you will have students for 8 weeks on either a Tuesday or Thursday afternoon between late September and mid November. Students will spend 3 hours one afternoon per week in your office.
  • The focus in 401A is on orienting the students to the ambulatory practice of medicine. Let them soak in the practice, see the joy of working with patients, and practice some independent interviewing of patients and vital sign determination. We also encourage you to demonstrate any other clinical skill you want (show them how you examine an abdomen — you don’t need to demonstrate as it is done in “Bates or Degowin”). While students are with you, they are also learning interviewing skills in their clinical skills course, social sciences, and ethics in their doctor/patient and society course, and the basic science underlying diseases in their lectures and problem based learning sessions.
  • There are also opportunities to facilitate seminars on vital signs & hypertension at the UBC campus for the 401A course.

First year Clinical Skills ~ Family Practice
January – May (MEDD 412)

  • For this segment of the FPC you will have students for approximately 14 weeks on either a Tuesday or Thursday afternoon between late January and May. We have lectures planned during public school spring break and encourage you to try to make up any other missed sessions but we also have a group of alternate preceptors who can fill in.
  • The focus in 401B is on continuing to let the students practice some independent interviewing as well as the skills associated with the above body systems that they are studying. Again, we also encourage you to demonstrate any other clinical skill you want. Students continue learning interviewing skills in their clinical skills course but now will add the head and neck, and respiratory and cardiovascular exam. In their doctor/patient and society course they will be learning:
    • public health;
    • addiction medicine;
    • evidence based medicine, and;
    • sexual medicine.
  • In their lectures and problem based learning sessions they will cover off:
    microbiology;
    immunology;
    the respiratory system;
    the cardiovascular system, and
    the renal and genital urinary system.

Second year Family Practice Continuum (FPC)
September – December (420A)

  • For this segment of the FPC you will have students for approximately 12 weeks on either a Wednesday or Friday afternoon between September and December. We encourage you to try to make up any missed sessions but we also have a group of alternate preceptors who can fill in.
  • In 420A, the students focus on continuing to perform independent interviewing as well as the skills associated with the above body systems they are studying. As second year students their problem solving skills will be increasing and we also encourage you to demonstrate any other clinical skill you want. Students continue learning interviewing skills in their clinical skills course but now will add the MSK system, ophthalmology and geriatrics. In their doctor/patient and society course they will be learning the organisation of the health care system, community interventions and violence and in their lectures and problem based learning sessions they will cover off the MSK system, blood and lymphatics, GI, and the endocrine system.

Second year Family Practice Continuum
January – May (420B)

  • For this segment, you will have a pair of students for one afternoon per week (Wednesdays or Fridays) in four week blocks, for a total of 16 weeks from January to early May.
  • For students, this course has three components:
    • Advanced Primary Care – a four week block in a full-serivce family practice office which allows students to further develop their clinical knowledge and skills in a real clinical setting with real patients, prior to embarking on their clinical work in Rural Practice and the Clinical Clerkship.
    • Focused Family Practice – two blocks of two weeks each, where the students select areas of special interest in family practice in which they wish to participate. The objective is to foster more advanced skill development while allowing students to explore the breadth of family practice. The areas of special interest include emergency medicine, geriatrics, hospital medicine, inner city medicine, maternity care, men’s health, oncology, palliative care, sports medicine, student health, surgical assisting & women’s health.
    • Seminars – an eight week block of seminars covers case-based clinical sessions on contraception, diabetes, heart failure, problem headaches & breast feeding, and practical skill development on suturing, injections, biopsies/excisions & prescription writing.