Course Descriptions

Family Practice Clinical Experiences

Over the first two years, the curriculum is broken down into 4 “Foundations of Medical Practice” (MEDD) courses, an orientation course and a “flexible enhanced learning” (FLEX) course. In general, Family Practice Clinical Experiences component of the MEDD courses consists of both classroom and experiential learning. Classroom learning is in the form of small group family physician-led seminars and lectures. The experiential component takes students out of the classroom and into actual clinical settings where they spend one afternoon a week in the office of a community Family Physician. This provides the students with their first exposure to clinical medicine and introduces them to the doctor-patient relationship as seen through the eyes of the Family Physician. They are introduced to both the diversity of medical practice, and to the reality of medical care as a continuum of care. They will observe and at the discretion of the preceptor, participate in various aspects of patient care. We don’t have an exhaustive list of objectives for you to cover off—we recognise that the magic occurs when we get teachers and learners together, so we ask that you give your students opportunities to learn medicine at your side and to practice the skills they are learning in the other parts of the curriculum. We also encourage you to allow students to do some patient interviews with the students giving you a summary of their findings for review.

The Four “Foundations of Medical Practice” MEDD Courses

First year, first term (MEDD 411)

Students are learning interviewing, history-taking and vital signs skills in their clinical skills course, and social sciences, ethics, and the basic science underlying diseases in their lectures and case-based learning sessions. The focus in the Clinical Experiences Family Practice component is on orienting the students to the ambulatory practice of medicine. Let them soak in the practice, see the joy of working with patients, and practice some independent interviewing of patients and vital sign determination. We encourage you to demonstrate other clinical and communication skills.

For this segment of the FMPR 411 you will have students for 8 weeks on either a Tuesday or Thursday afternoon between September and December.

First year, second term (MEDD 412)

Students continue learning interviewing and history taking skills in the clinical skills component of the course but now will add the head and neck, respiratory, psychiatric, neurologic, abdominal and cardiovascular exams. In the remainder of the MEDD 412 course, students will be learning about the foundational and social sciences underlying patient presentations and illnesses. The focus in MEDD 412 is on continuing to let the students practice some independent interviewing as well as the physical exam skills associated with the  body systems that they are studying. Again we also encourage you to demonstrate additional clinical or communication skills.

For this segment of the FMPR 412 you will have students for up to 10 weeks on either a Tuesday or Thursday afternoon between January and May.

Second year, first term (MEDD 421)

Students continue learning history-taking and physical exam skills in their clinical skills component of the course. The focus in MEDD 421 is on continuing to let the students perform independent interviewing as well as the physical examination skills associated with the body systems that they are studying. As second year students their problem solving and clinical reasoning skills will be increasing, and we also encourage you to demonstrate other clinical skills.

For this segment of the FMPR 421 you will have students for approximately 10 weeks on either a Wednesday or Friday afternoon between September and December.

Second year, second term (MEDD 422)

Students continue learning history-taking and physical exam skills. They will also be practicing their skills in clinical reasoning skills. This course will also prepare them for clerkships. The focus in MEDD 422 is to give students the opportunity to transition from largely classroom-based learning with some introductory clinical experiences into an almost exclusively clinical learning environment.

Student and preceptor

Contact for 1st & 2nd year

1st Year
Livia Piccinini
Phone:  604-827-4196
Fax:  604-822-6950
fmpr.y1@ubc.ca

2nd Year
Shanti Rivas
Phone:  604-875-4111 ex. 67895
Fax:  604-822-6950
fmpr.y2@ubc.

Rural Family Practice  Clerkship (Year 3)

Students are placed in rural communities throughout BC and in Inuvik, NWT for a four week period during the academic year.

This provides students with an understanding of the total health care needs of individuals and their communities, including an understanding of the philosophy of medical care that looks after patients from birth to death, and from home to hospital and back.

After two years of shadowing family physicians and gaining clinical skills. this clerkship allows students an active, “hands-on” experience to further develop their clinical examination and patient management skills,

For information contact:

Island Medical Program

Stacey Taylor — staceyt@uvic.ca

North Medical Program

Jennifer Young — jennifer.young@unbc.ca

Southern Medical Program

Janet Halbasch — janet.halbasch@interiorhealth.ca

Vancouver/Fraser Medical Program

Tina Wong — undergrad@familymed.ubc.ca

Year 4

In their final year, medical students do 2 or 4 week elective rotations of their choice.  All of the electives have been mapped to CaRMS entry disciplines as indicated on the elective descriptions. UBC Family Medicine electives occur in both urban and rural communities.

Electives in urban areas will be primarily office based with some exceptions that include Psychiatry, Palliative Care, & Hospitalist.

In rural areas, the electives are in family practice offices which may have a speciality in Sports Medicine, Palliative Care, Obstetrics, Emergency or the care of patients in their home settings.

Contact for Year 4

Tina Wong
Phone:  604-827-4304
Fax:  604-822-6950
fpelectives@familymed.ubc.ca